*MAJOR UPDATE IN PROGRESS* I’m revising this entire website, including LGBTQ+ Literature and Film. Thank you for understanding. On this page, I’m still re-checking all of the authors’ links.

New LGBTQ+ Authors’ Publications

Congratulations to these LGBTQ+ Authors, who have written to announce the publication of their books. Several of these titles are debuts.

Guidelines: If an LGBTQ+ author writes directly, with a one-sentence summary of your latest book and a link to your Web site or page, I’ll be happy to include your work. Please note that I’ve had to remove the email link temporarily, because of a deadline I’m facing. Disclaimer: Inclusion on this list does not imply endorsement. This page is a service to help promote new LGBTQ+ writing in all of its diversity.

In alphabetical order (the author’s name links to a related Website, if available)

  • Marcy Alancraig‘s A Woman of Heart (from the author: “The left-wing politics of Petaluma, California’s thriving community of Jewish chicken ranchers of the 1920’s is recreated as an elderly woman tells her life story to her granddaughter, uncovering family secrets about pogroms, alcoholism, adultery, sexual orientation, trust and friendship.”). Moffie by Andre Carl van der Merwe
  • Austin Alexis‘s Privacy Issues has won the 20th Annual Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award for a first full-length book of poems.
  • Donald Alford, Jr.‘s Confessions of a Mid-Life Crisis (from the author: “This story chronicles the impact of a 20 year old on a middle aged man who is experiencing a reawakening of spirit.”).
  • Christopher Allen‘s S. Teri O’Type (a Satire) (from the author: “A gay man in his forties who can’t seem to get gay enough for anyone to notice, let alone the man of his dreams, enlists his oldest and gayest friend, S. Teri O’Type, to drag him a few inches down The Road to Greater Gayness.”).
  • Gregory Allen‘s Well With My Soul (from the author: “This is my debut novel, coming out October 11, 2011; it deals with themes of addiction, homosexuality, religion, and family.”).
  • Ken Anderson‘s Sea Change: An Example of the Pleasure Principle (from the author: “I am honored that my novel is a finalist for The Ferro-Grumley Award. The book follows four tourists who meet in Italy and decide to travel together. Tyler is a bisexual writer with terrible secrets. Josh is a young architecture student grief-stricken over a man who went back to his wife. Phil and Billie are an older straight couple who bond with Josh because their son had the same name. Follow the four as they tour not only the sights of southern Italy, but also the museums and ruins of their own interior landscapes.).
  • Lamar Ariel‘s autobiographical Ready to Male: A Collection of Letters (about contemporary black gay male identity).
  • Jim Arnold‘s Benediction (from the author: “This novel offers a darkly humorous look at a middle-aged gay man’s journey with prostate cancer.”).
  • Elaine Beale‘s Another Life Altogether (from the author: “This is the story of a thirteen-year-old girl living in Northern England struggling to come to terms with her attraction to girls while living under the shadow of her mother’s mental illness.”).
  • Andrew W. M. Beierle‘s acclaimed novel First Person Plural (about “the lives of rare conjoined twins of the type dicephalus (two-headed), one of whom is gay and one straight” — won Best Men’s Fiction of 2007 from afterelton.com, and is nominated for a 2008 Lambda Literary Award for Men’s Fiction).
  • Ryan Berg‘s No House to Call My Home (from the author: “I hope this book will raise awareness about LGBTQ youth homelessness and help evoke some change in these young people’s lives.”)
  • Emory Black‘s Incident at Zhenbao (from the author: “Tom Hamilton, homophobic athlete fresh to prestigious all-male Ridgeston College, is thrust into a raw and gritty search for himself as he slams head-on into young and handsome Captain Mike Kelly, a Marine, and Tom’s Dorm Master.”).
  • Nick Borelli‘s FATA! The Act of the Avengeance (from the author: “This is a thriller about a United States Attorney who is recruited into FATA! (Fathers Against the Abuse), a secret society of wealthy, middle-age men and admiring young women, that avenges the deaths of females lost to violence.”).
  • Michael Boyd‘s Forever the Fat Kid (“growing up gay, black, and large, while pursuing a professional theater career”).
  • Mike Breen‘s The Angel (from the author: “University of Hawaii college junior Christopher is brilliant in biogenetics and can crack every problem except how to capture fellow student Kaleo, whose evangelical beliefs forbid that he succumb to Christopher, though he does repeatedly, leading Christopher into a passionate and erratic chase that only the deepest love can endure.”).
  • Shane Brown‘s Queer Sexualities in Early Film (This study examines images of male-male intimacy, buddy relationships and romantic friendships in European and American films made prior to 1934, placing these films within their socio-political and scientific context.).
  • Adriano Bulla‘s The Road to London (from the author: “This is an experimental book, mixing poetry and prose, that tells the story of a boy who grows up denying his own dominant and gay identity, in a hostile world that bullies him into creating an alternative reality, receiving messages from a club in a future London where he experiences the possibility of a happy life.”).
  • Nona Caspers‘s collection Heavier than Air (“I am the lesbian author of this book of stories [that] won the Grace Paley Prize in Short Fiction.”).
  • TP Catalano‘s No Strings: A Novel (This debut novel, that begins in the 1930s, explores a transgender man’s journey into self-acceptance).
  • Kari Caulfield‘s novel Pretty Blue.
  • Larry Closs‘s Beatitude (from the author: “New York City 1995: Propelled by a shared fascination with the unfettered lives of Jack Kerouac and the Beat Generation, two young men are irresistibly drawn together but find themselves forced to confront the same questions that confounded their heroes.”).
  • Stephan Cohen’s The Gay Liberation Youth Movement in New York: “An Army of Lovers Cannot Fail” (historical study covering 1966–1975).
  • Tiffany Colasuonno‘s No Man’s Land: Summertime (from the author: “Hardworking Jackie is unhappily married to Carmelo. When a friend of Carmelo’s, Summer, comes to live with them, Jackie is furious and judgmental toward her due to Summer’s profession as an exotic dancer.”).
  • Liam Concannon‘s The Season: A Novel (from the author: “Fin wants to leave the rat race and make a new life in Spain except his partner Lance, has no intention of giving up his high flying career.”).
  • William Conescu‘s Kara Was Here (from the author: “it tells the story of a failed actress whose sudden and mysterious death at thirty-four unhinges the lives of her closest friends” — previously highlighted here, his debut novel Being Written (“the story of a man who knows he’s a minor character in a book and the lengths to which he’ll go to win a bigger part”).
  • Cathy Corcoran‘s Magic Happens (from the author: “Kate Driscoll — suburban mom, recovering alcoholic, and self-described ‘relentless heterosexual’ — falls in love with the female instructor at the gym.”).
  • Ana Corman‘s A Celtic Knot (a romance about two fiercely independent women who must untangle their emotional knots, to find love).
  • Chris Corkum‘s XOXO Hayden (from the author: “Set in the late 1980’s, this is a tumultuous, unlikely love story between an English pop star and a suburban teenager.”).
  • Robin Crutchfield‘s Eleven Faerie Tales (from the author: “I am a performance artist/ musician, but in this book I use faerie tales to explore the nature of life and love”).
  • Jeanne D’eau‘s The Loves of Natalie Greenbaum, Book 1 (1929-1939) (from the author: “In my novel, nearing the end of her long existence, ninety-five year old Natalie Greenbaum — big band vocalist and jazz singer, wife, mother and a lesbian — reflects on the events of her life, the people she has loved and her personal struggles and triumphs during the tumultuous decades of the mid-20th Century, a time when homosexuality was considered a form of mental illness and even criminal behaviour.”).
  • Ellen Dean‘s Beautiful Strangers (from the author’s memoir: “My novel is about a lesbian diamond smuggling gynecologist.”).
  • T.Cecil DeCelles‘s Within A Glittering Heartland (from the author: “a Blackfeet/ GrosVentre American Indian (two-spirited) gay writer’s tales of unknown Tribal contemporary gay culture”).
  • Elliott DeLine‘s Refuse (from the author: “Dean, a 22 year old female-to-male-transsexual, is no LGBT poster boy — still living in the upstairs bedroom of his parents’ house in a conservative suburb, he can think of little to do but write a memoi of his would-be love affair with his college roommate, Colin, another trans man with a girlfriend and a successful indie rock band.”).
  • Amy DeMeritt‘s Love Triumphs Pain (from the author: “I am a newly self-published lesbian fiction author. My book is about a high school senior that goes through a brief period of depression in trying to understand her new feelings and attraction to a girl in school and the many highs and lows she experiences after coming to terms with who she is.”)
  • G. Roger Denson‘s Voice of Force (from the author: “My book chronicles the escalating estrangement and tragedy that ensues as a gay man and straight man search for mutual ground despite the family, faith, profits, and politics dividing them.”).
  • Kellie Doherty‘s Finding Hekate (from the author: “My novel is about a spaceship captain who’s being hunted and she has to decide whether to kill her crew and run like she’s done many times before or stick with her crew and fight. But the problem is, her time as herself is running out.”)
  • Mayra Lazara Dole‘s Down to the Bone (from the author: “My new novel, nominated for ALA Best YA Book 2009, is set in Miami with all Latino/a LGBT characters”).
  • Kergan Edwards-Stout‘s Songs for the New Depression (from the publisher: “Gabriel Travers knows he’s dying; he just can’t prove it…. Now almost 40, and with the clock ticking, Gabe begins to finally peel back the layers and tackle his demons — with a little help from the music of the Divine Miss M and his mom’s new wife, a country music-loving priest. Inspired by his years of working at AIDS Project Los Angeles, as well as the loss of a partner to the disease, this is a work of literary fiction, [with a contemplative style like that of] Michael Cunningham, mixed with the black humor of Augusten Burroughs.”).
  • Laury A. Egan‘s Jenny Kidd (In this psychological suspense novel, a young American artist in Venice, hoping to launch her career and establish independence from a tyrannical father, falls into a world of glittering façades that cloak sexual perversion, art forgery, and murder.).
  • Chase Erwin‘s Bloodbound (from the author: “This is a vampire story with a twist: the fact that the vampire is gay is not as ‘shocking’ as the fact that he is also an assassin for an intelligence network.”).
  • Jeri Estes‘s Stilettos and Steel (debut novel based on the author’s adventures as a teenage runaway in San Francisco’s Tenderloin in the 1960s where she became, in her words, a “female gangster pimp”).
  • Sarah Ettritch‘s Rymellan 1: Disobedience Means Death (from the author: “This is collection of short stories about two lesbians who live in a strict society that selects mates for its citizens.”).
  • Eurypon (pen name of Andrew Ashling)’s Dark Tales of Randamor the Recluse — Book I: The invisible Chains (from the author: “A long and brooding chronicle, set in a kind of Medieval world, about two estranged half brothers caught up in the intrigues of a kingdom under threat of invasion.”).
  • Beth H. Evans and Elayne C. Nicholas‘s The Watering Hole (from the authors: it’s “about the struggle shared by both women and gays in the late seventies, as a woman pushes her way hrough the glass ceiling of airline management, and her dearest friend struggles for acceptance and battles with AIDS”).
  • J.T. Evergreen‘s With All My Love (from the author: “My collection of twenty love stories assumes the position that love is a natural, normal, and necessary expression unfolding in as many ways as there are stars in the heavens, paving the way to spiritual freedom for all.”).
  • Ronald Fife‘s Kim (from the author: “Can-freedom seeking gay explorers help America overcome prejudice and oppression and join the technological paradise of the World Federation in 2112, or will there be war?.”).
  • Jacob Flores‘s Moral Authority (from the author: “In the year 2050, America has changed. Profoundly. Homosexuality is a crime, cursing is a punishable offense, and lifestyle legislation keeps American citizens on a prescribed moral path. Told from three points of view, Mark, the brash young hero who finds true love in the most desolate of places; Isaac, the renegade, who searches for redemption; and Samuel, the dictatorial megalomaniac intent on maintaining his power.”).
  • Bob Frey‘s The DVD Murders and The Vampire Murder & The Comic Book Murders (from the author: “These are two mystery novels that feature Frank Callahan, a gay LAPD detective.”).
  • Ron Fritschs‘s Promised Valley Rebellion (from the author: “This is the first of four Promised Valley novels asking whether civilization and history, with their countless heaven-sanctioned wars and genocides, could’ve begun differently — with, among other things, a rational recognition of the unique benefits LGBT individuals can bring to their people.”).
  • Jamison Gardner‘s novel Eight High In Heels (from the author: “The story gives an inside glimpse of the secret world of Trannys and the men that love them, as we follow Mani O’Malley’s transition from an attractive cross dresser to a gorgeous, passable transsexual.l”).
  • La’Von Gittens‘s Divine Apocalypse: The Beginning of the End (from the author: “This is the first book in my adult urban fantasy series about four reincarnated angels who battle the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse in Manhattan.”).
  • Alicia Goranson‘s science fiction novel Supervillainz.
  • Jeff Graubart‘s The Quest for Brian (a political thriller inspired by the author’s own experiences in 1970s gay activism).
  • Robert Greene‘s CROSSOVER: Straight Men — Gay Encounters (from the author: “These are short fiction stories that look at what compels straight men to have same-sex encounters.”); also his two collections, The Gay Icon Classics (from the author: “gay short fiction fables from around the world”) and The Gay Icon Contemporary Short Stories (from the author: “looks at the gay experience with modern day living… connecting us with a certain understanding of the human heart”).
  • Scott Gunther‘s The Elastic Closet: A History of Homosexuality in France, 1942 – Present (examining the interconnected realms of law, politics, and media).
  • April H.‘s On the way (from the author: “In this lesbian action-adventure-romance, my first novel, en route to medieval Jerusalem, Maeve falls in love with reticent Hospitaller knight Hugh Sinclair, and learns why he resists her charms.”).
  • Aaron Hamburger‘s novel Faith For Beginners and short fiction collection The View From Stalin’s Head.
  • Ryan Halloway‘s Totally Magilla (from the author: “Pete is at a turning point in his life, and he is planning a burglary; with help from gay loved ones he finds happiness.”).
  • Jaime Harker‘s Middlebrow Queer: Christopher Isherwood in America (from the author: “This is how Christopher Isherwood reinvented himself as an American writer through gay print culture of the postwar United States”) [Isherwood is the author of the classic autobiographical Berlin Stories, that was musicalized as Cabaret].
  • E.B. Hawkins‘s An Unusual Love (from the author: “Two very different couples find themselves entangled in an unusual love affair that neither of them understand”).
  • J. H. Hayes‘s Gravy In The Pie (from the author: “My latest novel is a humorous satire on fundamentalism as a pair of gay kissing cousins in Texas rescue their transgender nephew from the hillbillies of Arkansas.”).
  • Roxie Howard‘s The Brain God Gave Me: A Fictional Memoir Based Upon the True Life Story of Roxie Howard (“psychological and spiritual journey of a Christian judged by Bible-believers to be possessed by demons”).
  • Fay Jacobs‘s For Frying Out Loud — Rehoboth Beach Diaries (from the author’s publisher: “Life in Rehoboth Beach, a small resort town on the Delaware Coast,” known for its vibrant gay community).
  • Jae‘s Something in the Wine (from the author: “When her brother Jake sets up straight accountant Annie Prideaux on a blind date with lesbian winemaker Drew, they decide to turn the tables on him by pretending to fall in love.”).
  • Bev Jafek’s novella The Sacred Beasts appears in the Winter 2009 issue of the New Madrid Journal of Contemporary Fiction.
  • Tracy James Jones‘s Secrets & Lies (from the author: “My novel is an in-depth emotional journey into the private lives of four central characters that unfolds as a provocative, multi-cultural, modern romance with a GLBT twist.”).
  • Jeffrey Jude‘s The Disciples of Goedric Trilogy (from the author: “Weeks after the discovery of the gay gene is announced, IFC Pharmaceuticals announces the “gay cure;” but while the world is debating the drug’s merits, a suspicious fever kills hundreds of thousands of gay men in a matter of hours: take the gay cure or die.”).
  • Karen Kondazian‘s The Whip (from the author: “This novel is inspired by the true story of a woman, Charlotte ‘Charley’ Parkhurst (1812-1879) who lived most of her extraordinary life as a man in the old west. As a young woman in Rhode Island, she fell in love with a runaway slave and had his child. The destruction of her family drove her west to California, dressed as a man, to track the killer. Charley became a renowned stagecoach driver for Wells Fargo. She killed a famous outlaw, had a secret love affair, and lived with a housekeeper who, unaware of her true sex, fell in love with her. Charley was the first known woman to vote in America in 1868 (as a man).”).
  • M. Kei‘s Pirates of the Narrow Seas (from the author: “a lieutenant in the British navy during the Age of Sail must struggle to come out gay while surviving storms at sea, ship to ship battles, duels, kidnapping, and more in his quest for true love and honor on the narrow seas”).
  • Jerod Killick‘s Without A Testimony (from the author: “My new book explores the dramatic and complicated dynamics between Mormonism and sexuality.”).
  • C. D. Kirven‘s What Goes Around Comes Back Around (from the author: “My debut novel, that I also illustrated, is the story of a young woman who comes to grips with the meaning of true friendship, love and loss during the golden age of Hip Hop”).
  • Nina Knapp‘s Reel Food From Reel Women: Our Favorite Dishes (from the author: “This is a collection of favorite recipes from women/lesbians in the entertainment industry, as well as many friends; and includes a short biography of the women in film, comedy, and music.”).
  • K.C. Lauer‘s Bad Girl Gone Mom (from the author: “This is an inspirational non-fiction memoir about a girl who is born without all of her female parts.”).
  • Lyn Lejeune‘s Elijah Rising (from the author: “The story of the Ishmael-like friendship between two young men: a wealthy white New Yorker and a black tent-fundamentalist preacher, set in that period of turmoil and crisis in American history in which scientific marvels, social unrest, economic disasters, and the First World War, created new vistas about the individual and the nation”).
  • Frankie Lennon‘s The Mee Street Chronicles: Straight Up Stories of a Black Woman’s Life (from the author: “This is a candid memoir of stories about Frankie’s battle to claim her life and her sexuality.”).
  • Eleanor Lerman‘s The Blonde on the Train (from the author: “Confronted with illness, or the paranormal, or trying to fight off mysterious attacks on their computers, or simply remembering to honor the fact that they are still members of the Woodstock Nation, what the characters in these short stories — some gay, some Jewish — have in common is that they keep on keeping on, because that’s what people do”).
  • Richmond Lewis‘s Stark Raving Naked (from the author: this is “A mystery novel that’s part Carl Hiaasen and part Scooby Doo on quaaludes, this is a riveting and hysterical romp through a (slightly) twisted version of the modern South.”).
  • Vanessa Libertad Garcia‘s The Voting Booth After Dark: Despicable, Embarrassing, Repulsive (from the author: “My lesbian-themed book follows a group of gay & lesbian Latino club kids in Los Angeles during the course of the 2008 presidential elections.”).
  • Bruce Littlefield‘s Moving In: Tales of an Unlicensed Marriage (from the author: “This is the true story of fixing up a historic old house in the country with my partner Scott, one of NYC’s top realtors. Our baptism by fire, flood, mouse poop, and poison ivy is often riotously funny. Think gay Green Acres.” — book trailer video at YouTube).
  • Raymond Luczak‘s Men with their Hands (from the author: “My book, the first place winner of the Project: QueerLit 2006 Contest, revolves around a young deaf man trying to find a family of his own in New York City.”).
  • Scott Mainprize‘s A Waking Life (from the author: “My debut novel is about Nomad Truestar’s journey through the darkness of a single night, not knowing whether he will live or die, or if he will find the Borealis that exists within the darkness itself.”).
  • Carol Holland March‘s Star Crossed (from the author: “This is my collection of romantic stories of lesbian love in the magical land of the southwest, where past and present mingle, ghosts loiter behind rocks, and sandstone cliffs reveal their secrets if you know how to listen.”).
  • Timothy McGivney‘s Vampalicious (Hot off the press! — published July 20, 2012: “After barely surviving the first brutal days of a zombie apocalypse, doomsday lovers Joey and Walt find themselves at the mercy of two blood deprived vampires. Also caught in the crossfire is a lone vigilante, fearlessly searching for her beloved’s killer.”) and Timothy’s first novel, Zombielicious (from the author: “In order to survive, five strangers band together amidst a zombie outbreak, where an anything-goes attitude has become the law of the land and lust, betrayal, true love, and redemption are all just a gunshot away.”).
  • Stephen Mead‘s According to the Order of Nature (We too are Cosmos Made): Art and Text for Gay Spiritual Sensuality (from the author: This is an art-text hybrid book that explores and celebrates LGBT sensuality for its spiritual roots and profound bonding, more so when people risk their lives in order to have and to hold love.”)
  • Caleb A. Mertz‘s With Thoughts of Jason (a novel about the tragic phenomenon of high school bullying; the author also has another new book, The Silhouetted Leaves).
  • Stevie Mikayne‘s Jellicle Girl (from the author: “This is a story about the blurred lines of love and friendship, and the permanent consequences of one reckless mistake.”).
  • Ben Mitchell‘s novel Without One Plea (from the author: my novel “portrays the legal, social and religious struggles facing a young gay man who returns to his Southern roots”).
  • Perry Moore‘s gay superhero novel Hero (more).
  • Daniel Nickle‘s The Dashing Mister R (from the author: “An award-winning journalist has everything he ever wanted: a brilliant career, a nice Manhattan apartment, and he was in love, though he never expected it to be with a Catholic priest.”).
  • Randy Neece‘s Gone Today, Here Tomorrow: A Memoir (from the author’s friend Ivor Pine: “This chronicles Randy’s 25 year journey with HIV/AIDS against the backdrop of a wonderfully inspiring love story. He was diagnosed as HIV-positive in 1988, when he was 35, and went on to develop full blown AIDS in 1993, at which time the cocktail was introduced. Randy is now a healthy, active and personally and professionally fulfilled 60 year old, HIV-positive man who just celebrated his 25th wedding anniversary.”).
  • Peter Nicolas & Mike Strong’s The Geography of Love: Same-Sex Marriage & Relationship Recognition in America (The Story in Maps) (from the authors: “The book tells the story of efforts over the last 40 years to provide legal recognition of same-sex relationships in both words and maps.”).
  • Jacob Orenge‘s Viva Lost David (from the author: “This novel explores the trends and pop culture of today’s Millennial Generation through the eyes of David Vermillion, a recent college grad and lost twenty-something struggling with love and loss on a life-changing Las Vegas adventure.”).
  • Carol M. Palmer‘s Lover, Friend and Muse! (from the author: “In my novel, Beatrice Schütler, dying of cancer, suspects her husband of having an affair until she learns it’s not a woman she has to fear.”).
  • Samuel Park‘s novel Shakespeare’s Sonnets (site includes a short film based on the novel).
  • E.S. Parkinson‘s Somethin’ Else (from the author: “Set on the cusp of the 60s, when everything seemed grey and staying put felt as scary as getting out, this is the story of Jim, a British working class lad determined to get to university, but dreaming of nights on the town and the promise of rock and roll. Jim feels trapped in the post-war housing development, the routine of work and school, and with the girlfriend he can’t quite manage to fall in love with — until he meets Edward, full of passion and possibility, and in an instant, the world is turned upside down.”).
  • Scott D. Pomfret‘s The Second Half: A Gay American Football Story (from the author: My novels tells the story of a Division I college football coach who’s fallen in love with the starting quarterback and military veteran Brady Winter. Both men soon learn that love is no mere game and confront a hard choice between victory and integrity while time is running out.”)
  • Vince Pongor‘s Fragments of a crooked mirror (from the author: “This is a fantasy based on reality, a tale about the passage of an anti-heterosexual bill defending the traditional homosexual family values.”).
  • Glenda Poulter‘s Out of the Past (from the author: “While in Charleston, SC, on a buying trip for her antique store back in Texas, a womanfaces a sense of deja vu and learns of events from the 1800s that make her reevaluate her life.”).
  • Nick Radel’s Understanding Edmund White (from the author: “The book is designed to introduce non-specialists to White’s fiction.” White’s novels include A Boy’s Own Story, The Farewell Symphony, and Hotel de Dream.)
  • Allen Randolph‘s The Belgium Conundrum (from the authors: a “billionaire art dealer and his partner battle right-wing conservatism and hypocrisy in American politics becoming the catalyst for conspiracy, espionage and murder;” ‘Allen Randolph’ is the pseudonym for writing and life partners Rick Hall & Randy Smith).
  • Nikki Rashan‘s Double Pleasure Double Pain (“the story of a woman challenged by emerging affections toward a female classmate”).
  • Steven Reigns‘s Inheritance (from the author: “This collection of autobiographical poetry explores what one man is given from friends, family, the culture, and lovers.”).
  • Julia Diana Robertson‘s Beyond The Screen Door (from the author: “This is a new YA Supernatural series, which tells the coming of age story of best friends Nora Lee and Joanne who live in the small Washington State town of Hoquiam, a place with many secrets and spirits hidden behind closed doors.”)
  • Charlie Romo‘s Moonglow (from the author: “This is my debut novel, a sci-fi lesbian romance set in a future fashion world.”).
  • Toney Rowe‘s Trapped Inside a Female’s Body (from the author’s memoir: “Once rumors began to circulate that I was really a female, and someone threatened to kill me, I had to realize that it was time to find my true self…. This is a true story of my life.”).
  • Toni Sands‘s Orchid Pink (from the author: “Sapphic romps plus pressure to conform rock Victorian lady Adelaide’s life as she dreams among her favourite bad girl orchids.”).
  • Michael Schiavi‘s Celluloid Activist: The Life and Times of Vito Russo (this is a biography of the visionary gay rights activist and author of The Celluloid Closet, the landmark history of GLBT people and issues in film).
  • D. M. Schwab‘s 1001 Internet Jokes II – Gay And Lesbian Edition (from the author: “You don’t have to be Gay, Lesbian, or a Republican waiting in the bathroom stall to enjoy this ebook!”).
  • Jess C Scott‘s New Order (from the author: “A choice selection of stylishly wild and wicked GLBT stories, featuring a suave concert pianist…a bisexual succubus…two young ladies reliving and exploring their school friendship…m/m gay street sex…a gender-bender…and a hot, epic blog.”).
  • Alan Semrow‘s Ripe: Letters (from the author: “In this epistolary book, the author writes to the men who have impacted his outlook, reminded him of basic life lessons, surprised him in more ways than one, and left him reeling for days.”); and Briefs (from the author: “The lives of mycharacters in this debut collection are like the charged particles in the atmosphere before the storm; these stories, while brief, are torrid and turbulent, as relationships crash apart, people find themselves damp with more than tears, and the silver linings of the storm clouds remain tantalizing, out of reach.”).
  • Robert L. Sheeley‘s novel Rainbow Plantation Blues (described by the author as the “story of a young South Carolina slave holder in 1850 who falls in love with one of his male slaves”).
  • Brandon Shire’s two novels: Listening To Dust (from the author: “Murder touched Stephen Dobbins when he was a young boy and left him living in a void of aching loneliness. A chance meeting with a young American chased away the fear that he would always be alone and brought him the prospect of a new existence.”), and The Value of Rain (from the author: “This is a tale of claustrophobic intensity about a young boy whose life is almost destroyed by his outrage at being institutionalized for a single act of youthful desire.”).
  • Christopher Soden‘s Closer (from the author: “I’ve been vigilantly writing poetry about my struggles and joys as a gay man for 35 years.”).
  • Steven Stanley‘s Moroccan Roll (comic novel about a small group of American and French twenty-something singles teaching in a Moroccan town).
  • Kissa Starling‘s Sweet Kisses & Lesbian Wishes (from the author: “This is an anthology of my lesbian romance short stories”).
  • James Steiner‘s Sin and Celluloid, A Tale of Hollywood (from the author: “Inspired by classic films such as All About Eve and Sunset Boulevard, this is a satirical look at how ambitious Hollywood types use money, sex, and power to control and manipulate).
  • Teresa Stores‘s Backslide (from the author: “a lesbian novelist who, after being shot by an enraged fundamentalist, slides back through her own life to the pivotal years of 1969–70, with Woodstock, the Vietnam War, Kent State shootings, feminism”).
  • Jerry Stubblefield‘s Homunculus (from the author: “My novel explores the psycho-sexual aspect of an artist (a playwright) trapped in a marriage, and contains a strong transgender theme.”).
  • Ron J. Suresha‘s anthology, Hibernation and Other Poems by Bear Bards (from editor Ron Suresha: “This is a smart, sexy, eclectic poetry collection by a veritable Who’s Who in Hirsute Gay and Bi Men’s Literature, with 100 poems by 40 esteemed poets, including David Bergman, Alfred C. Corn, Jameson Currier, Gavin Geoffrey Dillard, Jack Fritscher, Daniel M. Jaffe, Raymond Luczak, Jeff Mann, Jay Neal, Ron Mohring, Felice Picano, Jay Starre, Jim Stewart, and Emanuel Xavier.”).
  • J. Carter Swift‘s Stories of The Boy with the Yellow Socks (from the author: “In this collection of short stories, Jan Blixen proves that intolerance is no match against his greatest gift…his gift of gentleness.”).
  • Scott Norton Taylor‘s It’s a Boy! (FREE online — from the author: “Hell hath no fury like a gay man whose Jean Paul Gaultier cologne has been emptied to make a bong. The true story of a gay couple’s attempt to raise a homeless thirteen year old boy who brings with him a drug habit, learning disorders, a temper, warrants for his arrest, drug dealers hunting him and a desperate need to belong. The year was 1997. The place, Melbourne Australia.”).
  • Mark Tedesco‘s I am John I am Paul: A Story of Two Soldiers in Ancient Rome (from the author: “This is the new, second edition of my book, the true story of two 4th century soldiers; it is almost a blend between a subtle Brokeback Mountain with Ben-Hur“).
  • T. T. Thomas‘s Two Weeks At Gay Banana Hot Springs (from the author: “When the ever-lovely Billie White, a gorgeous female and former flame of our heroine, Margaret (Ret) Butler, checks into the Gay Banana, the banana palms are flowering, the champagne is flowing, the sparks are flying, the mortgage is overdue and the bank, which Ret’s Daddy owns, is making those most unpleasant foreclosure sounds.”).
  • Robert Thomson‘s Tiny Grievances (from the author: “My book presents a series of alternative anti-heroes doing everything they can to survive and thrive with varying degrees of awareness of self and others.”)
  • Jery Tillotson‘s I, A Man (from the author: “In this memoir, I look back over 70 years at the men I’ve loved and lost. I’d also like to highlight another of my many books, Orgy, about frisky 20-year-old bisexual Sammy Buck, the notorious number-one movie star, who encounters a strange young man who may be the lover that he has long sought.”).
  • Johnny Townsend‘s The Abominable Gayman (from the author: “A gay Mormon missionary in Italy faces many challenges, learns about life, and falls in love.”).
  • Ivan V., although not a GLBT-identified author, has “collected some masterworks… of world love literature, many of which [are] homoerotic.”
  • Sarah Van Arsdale‘s In Case of Emergency, Break Glass (from the author: “This is my new collection of three novellas, with bisexual protagonists in two of the stories, featuring contemporary American women traveling in Europe, and the third set in the Arctic in roughly 1000 BC, featuring a character who is what we today would call ‘gender variant.'”)
  • André Carl van der Merwe‘s Moffie (from the author: “My debut novel Moffie (a derogatory Afrikaans term for a gay man) is a result of my need to make sense of the madness around me while I was doing compulsory military service in South Africa during the 1980’s. I had nowhere to turn for help or understanding — not to my parents, my Church or my friends.”).
  • Wynn Wagner‘s novel Recovering Catholic (from the author: “My latest non-fiction book is not entirely gay, but it does address issues of interest to the GLBT community, including priest-predators and the Vatican’s lame attempt to deflect the blame for those predators onto being gay.”).
  • Timothy Wang‘s Slant: A Novel (from the author: “An Asian student from MIT will do anything to get his first boyfriend back while negotiating the pitfalls of the gay clubs, appeasing his tiger mom, and managing his own insecurities.”).
  • May Water‘s Seaside Surrender series (from the author: “Follow the bisexual foursome Molly, Jess, Michael and Evan as they explore their love and friendship while tackling the stresses of women’s oppression, gay rights, and same sex marriage in turn of the century New England.”).
  • J.L. Weinberg‘s True Religion (from the author: “My debut novel is an exploration of the supernatural, with a distinctly gay and New Age slant. An unexpected encounter with an otherworldly spirit at a holiday party in the Orenda Valley sends Seth Davis, a gay journalist from Manhattan, on a profound religious journey. Along the way, Seth stumbles into a quarreling coven of witches in the charming tourist town of Hope Springs, Pennsylvania, formerly known as Hell’s Ferry, and one of the most haunted destinations in America. As Seth learns more of the town’s remarkable history, he also uncovers his own shocking past, and in order to seek peace for his troubled soul, he must determine the fate of the coven, the town, and the entire Orenda Valley.”).
  • Melanie West‘s novel Conflict of Interest (“lesbian business attorney Meg Stryker’s life and love depend on her solving a murder mystery”).
  • James Whalley’s two new books: Flying Lobsters and Magic Tagines (“A comic adventure in Morocco… A young man decides to buy a house in order to learn Arabic and winds up with a horrific hotel!”), and The Hellespont (“A tragic love story of two schoolboys who decide to copy Lord Byron and swim the Dardanelles straits”). Mr. Whalley’s exceptional career includes having produced Derek Jarman‘s first two classic films, Sebastiane and Jubilee, and having collaborated on the others. As Mr. Whalley wrote on March 24, 2012, he is currently “writing about Iran, before the revolution, where I spent 2 years.”
  • Michael Willhoite‘s The Venetian Boy (A young man, living unhappily with his parents and smarting from a disastrous love affair, is reprieved by an offer to work for his uncle, a respected art and antiquities dealer in Venice. There, he finds sexual obsession, self-discovery, and tangled loyalties).
  • Tom Williams‘s The White Rajah (from the author: “This is the story of a Victorian adventurer ruling his own kingdom in Borneo, astold by his gay lover”).
  • L.R. Williamson‘s comic novel Prairie Springs (“a young Jewish woman… and her gay best friend” move from Manhattan to a small Texas town; more than secrets come out).
  • Sonia Vazquez‘s Down by the Riverbank (the life of a young woman whose experiences range from “abuse by her stepfamily…[to] falling in love with a girl”).
  • Elizabeth Worley‘sRisking Everything: Coming Out in Coffee Land (from the author: “this is a true tale of adventure, betrayal, redemption and finding the courage to risk everything for love in the rain forest of Panama.”).
  • Iolanthe Woulff‘s She’s My Dad (from the author: “This is a suspenseful tale of a transsexual woman who is forced to overcome unforeseen coincidences and prejudices in order to prove to herself and others the power of love.”).
  • Cayr Ariel Wulff‘s Circling the Waggins; How 5 Misfit Dogs Saved Me from Bewilderness (an unflinchingly honest portrayal of two women and their life together, founded on the love of dogs. Her previous book is Born Without a Tail, the true-life adventures of two animal rescuers living with an ever-changing house full of pets).
  • Victor Yates‘s A Love Like Blood — WINNER 2016 Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Debut Fiction (from the author: “My novel is about a half Somali and Cuban 17-year old, dealing with the intricacies of sexuality, race, Americanism, syncretism, and migration under his dying father’s abusive hand.”)
  • Chuck Zito‘s popular mystery series about stage manager/amateur sleuth Nicky D’Amico: A Habit For Death (2006) and Ice In His Veins (2007).

Begun 1997 / Revised October 21, 2020

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